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Thread: Things I wish I'd known about BFing before Baby Came

  1. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by PurplePasion View Post
    I wish someone had told me to check my milk for high amounts of lipase (severe soapy taste) before building up my stash and having to throw it all out.
    How do you check for this? Sorry I'm a newbie.




  2. #92

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    I wish I had known that breastfeeding is more of an art than a science!! That my baby would not always want to eat for 15 minutes on each side every three hours. That sometimes she would only nurse for 5 minutes on one side, and not take the other side. Or that sometime she would go 2 hours and want to eat again - or go 4 or 5 hours. And that it is OK and not to stress out about it!!
    BFP 8/6/08! Brailey was born 4/4/09!


  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BabyHopes View Post
    How do you check for this? Sorry I'm a newbie.
    See how long your EBM stays fresh 1) at room temp 2) in the fridge and 3) in the freezer... Depending on how long it lasts and what it starts to smell/taste like will tell you if you have a problem with your EBM. soapy = too much lipase

    ETA: You don't need to use a lot just enough to do taste tests on every few hours (room temp), everyday (fridge) like an ounce or so. Freezer is a little more complicated but I'd suggest freezing small amounts seperately so you can thaw some each week to test. All in all... I could have 'wasted' 4 oz tops experimenting with instead of ending up throwing out 75 oz...
    Last edited by PurplePasion; 06-10-2009 at 02:11 PM.

    No more excuses... Just don't quit!

  4. #94

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    That the person who is supporting you the most will most likely pi$$ you off the most! With little sleep and a newborn that has been attatched to your boob for HOURS when you are sobbing- sometimes the last thing you want anyone to say to you is to KEEP HIM ON THE BOOB! But- once you find a way to relax and go with the flow and things get easier... you truly appreciate that person helping you get thru the rough beginning! Love ya Mom!!


  5. #95

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    That it's normal for your sex drive to PLUMMET while breastfeeding. Awww...hormones.

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,341

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    Quote Originally Posted by hijacob View Post
    That it's normal for your sex drive to PLUMMET while breastfeeding. Awww...hormones.
    Really? Sheesh! I wish I'd known that earlier. I don't need to stress so much about being disinterested....

    Why am I in this Bee costume, Mom?


  7. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by RosieLB View Post
    Really? Sheesh! I wish I'd known that earlier. I don't need to stress so much about being disinterested....
    I know, right? Thankfully my DH has been awesome about it (I think he's too tired with our LO to get too excited about sex, too). But I seriously thought something was really wrong with me until I did a little research. Maybe THAT's the real reason why BF'ing is a good birth control method. Can't get PG if you're not DTD!

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    13,495

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    I wish I'd known that I'm truly never stop worrying about supply. 7.5 months in and it's still a concern.
    Audrey (38) DH (34), Lilly (DD), Logan (DS). Breastfeeding is more than feeding. It is communication between mother and baby. It is a form of nurturing; it is an act of love.

  9. #99

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    -If you don't have a comfortable couch, spend the money (even if you think you shouldn't) and buy a new one...you will be spending so much time on it in the first few months that it's worth it. I wish I had.
    - Have healthy finger foods on hand all the time and a lot of water for during feedings.
    - Have either really good cable or lots of movies for endless feeding in the first few months.
    - Sometimes it will hurt no matter what you do...it will get better, but it will hurt.
    - I never knew that I would get to 6 months of breast feeding and be ready to keep going and be sooooo proud!!!

  10. #100

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    I LOVE this thread!! I have to say that I have fallen madly in love with my baby boy and I can stare at him for hours while I b'feed him. I've had non sleep nights because he wants to b'feed constantly and barely have time for myself. It has been painful at times, but I wouldn't trade it for anything in the world!!

  11. #101

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    Thank you sooo much for everyone that posted! I bottle fed both my first two and I really want to BF this one and I am a third time Mom and a first time BF so all the advice and knowledge is REALLY useful, I am so glad I joined
    James 3yrs "Cheeseburger" back to heaven 2/14/02

  12. #102
    DorothyD Guest

    Default Breast Pumps

    Thoroughly research a breast pump before you make your purchase. Ask as many other women as you can about their experiences with whichever pump they used, and compare your circumstances to theirs (breast size, nipple size, amount of pumping you plan to do).

    If the pump you purchase breaks, you can get a replacement from the manufacturer while under warranty. However, if the pump just doesn't work well for you, but still functions, you can not exchange or return a used pump. I found this out the hard way.

    I did find a store online that does allow returns, but they only sell Ameda pumps, which I've never tried. It's called Ameda Direct. So if you're looking for an Ameda breast pump, you might want to try there.

    Also, go with a closed system breast pump if you can afford it. Much safer for baby!

  13. #103

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    These posts are very encouraging. I am a first-time mommy, and trying to figure out BF so badly. It's been one week, and things are slowly starting to fall into place. I'm very reassured that many of you have had similar experiences to what I am going through right now...
    Me (34), DH (36), DS1, DS2 & 1 Angel (1/17/2012)



  14. #104

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    Since I knew I was going back to work, I should have started pumping and building a BM stash asap. I didn't and now go day to day. It works, but it would be nice to have that extra in the freezer
    Lonnie ~ Mommy to Crabby Patty and Lovebug .

  15. #105

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    thank you so much for the info im due any day now and finding this part of the forum is going to help me out a lot especially when im in the hospital and feel more better about telling the nurses no if they try giving her formula. i really want to breastfeed and avoid formula as much as i can at first.


    me(26) DH(28) DD:Born Jan.12,2010 @6:42pm
    Finally we have our baby after 3 yrs of ttc

  16. #106
    lauravdn Guest

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    I wish I would have known to start using nursing pads before my milk came in. On my first night, just the tiny bit of colostrum caused my nipple to stick to the inside of my bra, and without realizing it, I opened my nursing bra in the middle of the night and tore the top layer of skin. OUCH! Dealing with the healing nipple combined with engorgement is soooo painful!

  17. #107

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    In the beginning it is VERY demanding but it gets better.
    You don't have to love it.
    After you have established a relationship with your LO it's empowering.

    Here are my top-10 must-have fridge/pantry items for breastfeeding moms.

    1. Seven minute steel-cut oatmeal with fruit (e.g strawberries) and walnuts.

    2. Homemade trail mix. I mix 1 tablespoon of cashews, 1 tablespoon of raisins and 1 tablespoon of chocolate/carob chips. Get creative.

    3. Non-fat yogurt with blueberries - very soothing and satisfying.

    4. Smoothies made with non-fat organic yogurt, juice, and flaxseed.

    5. Lean protein such as chicken, pork-loin, lean beef or fish. Eat 3-4 servings per day to help handle hunger pains throughout the day.

    6. Organic eggs with DHA - great meal choice and snack for mom (also great for baby's brain development).

    7. Vegetables such as green salad, cucumbers and tomatoes. Some vegetables are a little tricky; such as broccoli and cabbage. Sometimes the baby can get gassy so keep an eye out for baby's reaction.

    8. Whole grain crackers, pita bread, and tortillas which are great with hummus, dips and cream cheese & veggies.

    9. Fruit such as apples (with peanut butter), bananas, mangoes, pineapples and other seasonal fruit. Mix them up and have as mid-day snack.

    10. Water!!! Did I say water? Water is the absolute best drink for the breastfeeding mom. It helps replenish fluids and helps maintain overall performance especially if you're exercising.
    http://www.inspire.com/groups/pregna...d-weight-loss/
    Last edited by lfmzmd; 03-03-2010 at 02:54 PM. Reason: I keep learning about breastfeeding



  18. #108

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    I wish someone had told me that it WILL hurt. Even with a "picture perfect latch" according to an LC-it was still really painful for the first few weeks. Take a vacuum and stick it to any body part for 3 weeks straight and you are bound to have some pain!

    I wish someone had told me to get a pump beforehand. even if you are a SAHM like me, being able to pump to have DH do a couple of feedings is such a lifesaver. and midnight trips to walmart with aching nipples and a constantly nursing baby are no fun!

    Also, it would have been nice to know that in the beginning, it is normal for babies to want to nurse 23/7 and sleep for the only hour left in the day. I was doubting my supply constantly but it was "normal".


  19. #109

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    Don't be disappointed if you have plans to nurse for at least a year and baby has different plans
    Settings\Celes\My Documents\My Pictures\Anissa_Apr 2010\2010-04 (Apr)-08\IMG_1325.JPG

  20. #110

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    -If you have really big breasts, not even those bravado bras fit. I wasted a ton of money when my xxl champion jog bras were just fine. They lack support, but at least through your leave and in the evenings, they're comfortable 24/7, you can sleep in them, and you can just pop a breast over the top when it's time to feed. And they're way cheaper than nursing bras. Also works nicely if you are using lanolin or want to use cold packs in between feedings.

    -If you're going to be a career mom, plan ahead for where you'll pump. If you haven't done it already, check with your workplace after your sure the BF is working out to figure out what locations are appropriate, whether they'll allow you the time you'll need to pump, and where you'll store the milk. My office lets women use the rest room; at least it's a nice one. A friend, though, ended up with a supply closet. Like a stool, surrounded by shelves of post-it notes and pens. Another had to hang charts on the glass walls of her office so no one could see in.

    Quote Originally Posted by heartmyboyz View Post
    Nurses don't know everything.
    And lactation consultants, like anyone, can be idiots, too. Don't assume that just b/c someone has that title that they are good care providers. No matter where you get help first, you may have to look elsewhere for advice - and that can include doctors and nurses. (Long story short, one of my LCs actually diagnosed thrush over the phone. Told me that the pain wasn't from the latch as I'd thought but rather I'd infected my son - who'd just been released from the NICU for multiple infections. We were terrified... until both my ob/gyn's office and the nurse at the pediatrician's office confirmed that neither of us had symptoms of infection. The lady just had better things to do and when she couldn't get me in for 5 days, she took an irresponsible shortcut. At the time, though, I was taking her word as gospel. I mean all this chick does is boobs, right? My mistake.)

    Quote Originally Posted by expecting@40 View Post
    Don't be disappointed if you have plans to nurse for at least a year and baby has different plans
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaisaphira View Post
    I wish I would have known that many women are sad when their babies wean... {I cried for 2 wks...}
    Or when your body fails you. Rather, you will be disappointed, perhaps for a long time. I cried for days - in part due to the severe PPD, I'm sure - and I still think about those starfish hands on my breasts every single time that I feed my son. End of the day, remember that your health, your child's health, your family's overall health... that's what matters. You're not a failure if this part of parenthood doesn't work out as you'd planned.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaisaphira View Post
    I wish I would have known that it doesnt matter what ppl think or even say when you are nursing in public, its natural and beautiful! {It took me months to figure that out.}
    The flip side of that comes when you wean or use a bottle. No matter why or when you stopped, there will always be another mom somewhere who will think (and who won't hesitate to suggest) that she's a better mom than you because she BF for longer, did it more publicly, didn't use bottles, etc. You may stop at 6 weeks, 6 months, whatever, and you'll still get dirty looks and comments from someone else who believes that you're not as committed to motherhood as she is. It's inevitable in either direction, and it's dumb on both accounts.
    Last edited by ibisgirldc; 03-04-2010 at 11:54 PM.

  21. #111
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    4,092

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    That my boobs totally suck. Not only do I not have nipples but my milk is minimal.

  22. #112

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    Ten Nursing Pitfalls By: Diane West and Lisa Marsaco

    Click on the link above for more in depth information. The ten pitfalls are:
    1. Latch-on problems
    2. The Sleepy Newborn
    3. Unnecessary Supplementation
    4. Pacifiers
    5. Clock-Driven Feeding Durations & Feeding Schedules
    6. Busyness
    7. Outside Interferences
    8. Hormonal Birth Control
    9. Herbs
    10. Alcohol


  23. #113

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    ...that even with small breasts BFing is possible. i was worried about this, but all has gone smoothly. i do have 'great' nipples but my baby deserves all the credit as he took to it right off. also i wish i had known that even if you supplement with a little formula in the early daze (ha ha) as milk is coming in, baby will still BF. since i had a general anaesthetic with my CS it took me about 4 hrs before i met him, and the little guy was hungry! so i agreed he should take some formula from a little cup until i could offer him my boob. the formula supps a couple nites later let me sleep (thank god) in hospital, but since then, all breast milk. no schedule, just feeding when he seems to want food and/or comfort

  24. #114

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    ...that it would be really, really hard until about 2 months in. Things are great now, but it took a long time to get here.
    Bethany (40) & Brian (38) ~ Happily married for 7 years!


  25. #115

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    Almost 11 months of BF and I hope to make it to at least 1 year! I wished I had known:
    1) Use lactations consultants but know that they are not always right. I met with a few in the hospital and one after discharge and it was not until the third one came along, that I got the help I needed.
    2) It is really tempting to reach into your freezer or pumped milk stash when the LO is eating non-stop or you don't feel like pumping or you think you are not producing "enough"-don't unless it's necessary. I wished I hadn't used so much of my milk freezer stash right away.
    3) The beginning is rough. You are sleep deprived, you worry you are not producing enough, your ladies hurt. It takes practice. It doesn't happen overnight. It took about 3 weeks for both of us to get the hang of it.
    4) When pumping, make sure you have the right size flanges. Once I got the right sized ones, I was able to pump a lot more.
    5) Relax-ha ha. I know easier said than done but it helps. I was so tense in the beginning that it really made things so much harder.
    6) That even though having the baby be with you soon after birth and BF soon after is ideal, you can still breastfeed successfully if that does not happen. My LO was in the NICU and got formula and pumped milk in the beginning but with hard work was able to learn to latch and has been BFing since.
    I think that's it!


  26. #116

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    I wish someone had told me the proto-typical holds may not be right for me and baby and to hold her how we feel most comfortable. I went through 10 days of hell trying to get her to latch using the holds they describe in books and how the LCs at the hospital and pediatrician's office told me. But once I calmed down and held her in a position that felt right to us (which was most definitely not one of the traditional holds), she latched on and we've been nursing without issue since.

    2/09 6/09 4/14

  27. #117
    smithson654 Guest

    Default BFing babies feed

    General BFing is far more time intensive than formula feeding because BFing babies feed, milk breaks down faster and is digested faster. About BFing before Baby Came are extremely common! Just because your baby has a hard time figuring out a latch. Learn how to type with one hand because nursing sessions can be Lonnie success with BFing are making sure that you are informed and surrounded by support.


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    Last edited by smithson654; 10-31-2012 at 12:31 PM.

  28. #118

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    That guilt doesn't help. That plenty of women don't b-feed and their children grow up to be healthy. I know it sounds counter intuitive-and I, by the some crazy dumb luck, 'easily' breastfeed-I saw soooooo many friends beat themselves up over not being able to do it "right." Supplementing etc.

    I also wish I would have let the nurses give my first born formula-I cried and cried-she was sooooooo hungry and so I nursed 24/7 while she screamed. We both could have used a break.

    What worked for ME (and many would not recommend-I'm NOT a doctor)-when my 2nd and 3rd were born-I pumped from day one. My milk came in and I had a ton-I just felt like it was a good start. I became engorged-but since I was sitting around I figured might as well pump.

  29. #119
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
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    I guess for me, it was really painful the first week or so. I know a lot of women have trouble with pain while nursing the first week. As long as baby is latched appropriately, it should get better. (It got so much better for me!) I would just say to try to keep going if you're going to nurse. Give it a few weeks and if it's still really painful then get some help through a lactation consultant. But if you don't keep going, it's ok. Baby will still be fine and it DOES NOT make you a bad mom.
    Katie DeBoer

    The Best for Pregnancy, Mom, and Baby
    http://thebestpregnancy.com/

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