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Thread: Their own name

  1. #1

    Question Their own name

    Sophia still can't say "I'm Sophia" She says it without the "ph" and adds and "r" sound "Soria" . She will be 3 November 15th. I am not going to making a special appointment just for this but, I might ask the pediatrician at her next appointment in November. I know she can make the "ph" sound because she does say "fish" very clearly. Thoughts?
    *** Lindsay ***



  2. #2

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    I wouldn't worry about it, especially if she is pronouncing the "ph" in other words. My speech-pathologist friend said that sometimes kids will begin to swap out sounds they've been using correctly as they are learning new sounds. This seems to be the pattern with DS and it usually returns to the correct version within a few months.
    Jen (34), DH (36), DS (3), Baby #2 EDD 10/21/14


    Lost a loved baby 9/2012

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by GatorGRITS View Post
    I wouldn't worry about it, especially if she is pronouncing the "ph" in other words. My speech-pathologist friend said that sometimes kids will begin to swap out sounds they've been using correctly as they are learning new sounds. This seems to be the pattern with DS and it usually returns to the correct version within a few months.
    OK Thank you!
    *** Lindsay ***



  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by GatorGRITS View Post
    I wouldn't worry about it, especially if she is pronouncing the "ph" in other words. My speech-pathologist friend said that sometimes kids will begin to swap out sounds they've been using correctly as they are learning new sounds. This seems to be the pattern with DS and it usually returns to the correct version within a few months.
    thread hijacked!!!! lol

    at what age do you begin to worry about this? ds just turned 4 and still confuses m and n (maked instead of naked, tormado for tornado) with several words he says the right letter, as in nap and natalie, mommy and map. so when should i worry?



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by froggie83 View Post
    thread hijacked!!!! lol

    at what age do you begin to worry about this? ds just turned 4 and still confuses m and n (maked instead of naked, tormado for tornado) with several words he says the right letter, as in nap and natalie, mommy and map. so when should i worry?
    Usually when we diagnose a speech sound disorder it is when there are consistent patterns of error that don't seem to be resolving themselves on their own. Sounds can be inconsistent for quite a while, and some kids also have words that "fossilize" due to just being misheard/learned incorrectly. Pronouncing a sound incorrectly in one or two words is nothing to worry about at all, but patterns of error that linger is something to be looked at depending on the sound and the age of the child. What really matters is whether it interferes with being understood and causes frustration. The speech sound system doesn't fully mature until 7 or so in many kids.

    http://www.speech-language-therapy.c...min&Itemid=117
    http://www.speech-language-therapy.c...min&Itemid=117
    http://www.speech-language-therapy.c...min&Itemid=117
    http://www.speech-language-therapy.c...min&Itemid=117
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwenn View Post
    Usually when we diagnose a speech sound disorder it is when there are consistent patterns of error that don't seem to be resolving themselves on their own. Sounds can be inconsistent for quite a while, and some kids also have words that "fossilize" due to just being misheard/learned incorrectly. Pronouncing a sound incorrectly in one or two words is nothing to worry about at all, but patterns of error that linger is something to be looked at depending on the sound and the age of the child. What really matters is whether it interferes with being understood and causes frustration. The speech sound system doesn't fully mature until 7 or so in many kids.
    thank you! if i sit him down and say the mis-pronounced words then spell them then say them again he will say it right... so from what you said its been learned wrong and i just need to keep correcting him?



  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by froggie83 View Post
    thank you! if i sit him down and say the mis-pronounced words then spell them then say them again he will say it right... so from what you said its been learned wrong and i just need to keep correcting him?
    That is what we are doing with DD right now. And she is so stubborn with some of her incorrect words that she actually tries to correct us to say them like her!


    Anne (37) DH (37) Olivia (4) Harrison (1)

  8. #8
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    I am not a fan of "correcting" words - the exception being in therapy when I am physically teaching them how to say it. Just model them back so he gets lots of chances to hear them. Often kids can hear the words correctly before they know how to say them properly, so they think they are repeating them back correctly when actually they aren't - as Anne is experiencing! In those cases, correcting can be counterproductive. Just that extra modeling to help them figure out that what they are saying doesn't match what they think they are saying.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

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