Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Interesting new autism study results

  1. #1

    Default Interesting new autism study results

    Finding a possible link with elevated male hormones during pregnancy http://www.iflscience.com/brain/elev...-linked-autism
    Last edited by ibisgirldc; 06-03-2014 at 06:02 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    Link isn't working for me.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In my head
    Posts
    11,871

    Default

    I was reading this earlier. Very interesting.
    Me (39) DH (46) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toeing the edge between sanity and insanity
    Posts
    30,541

    Default

    Glad to see they're pursuing this-I saw frontline research outlining male hormon elevation about three years ago but hadn't seen anything since.

    Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In my head
    Posts
    11,871

    Default

    It's the same researcher who made the original speculation who was behind this study. Nice to see someone putting in the work to back up their hypotheses and even nicer to see the research begin to bear it out.
    Me (39) DH (46) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  6. #6

    Default

    Very interesting.


    Anne (37) DH (37) Olivia (4) Harrison (1)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    14,336

    Default

    Interesting, thank you for sharing. With so many chemicals that disrupt hormonal balance in our environment and food that, it is not surprising at all.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    3,550

    Default

    One of the hormones listed was cortisol--the stress hormone. Are those cortisol levels related to maternal stress levels? Just food for thought, we've always known that "stress is bad" but this could put a new face on it.
    Natalie [31] DH [40] 9/01, 1/06 NaturallyNatalie's Hair Accessories!

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by impatient View Post
    Interesting, thank you for sharing. With so many chemicals that disrupt hormonal balance in our environment and food that, it is not surprising at all.
    It could be that, but such a determination might be very far off. I'm no scientist, but I'd think that they'd have to show that the same elevation difference exists in the female sample. And then if that's proven, then they'd try to find commonalities among those with the elevations for both genders. Could be environment or food (no idea what that might be in Denmark) but might be something entirely natural, too. But maybe it's a start which would be awesome!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In my head
    Posts
    11,871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Geneari View Post
    One of the hormones listed was cortisol--the stress hormone. Are those cortisol levels related to maternal stress levels? Just food for thought, we've always known that "stress is bad" but this could put a new face on it.
    Yes, I have read speculation that maternal stress levels might play a role, both in the increased cortisol and also testosterone and progesterone. All of these hormones are in our bodies naturally, the question is why the levels are elevated here. But so far all of this is correlation and no cause-effect has been documented. My money is that this is a very promising direction, though.
    Me (39) DH (46) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    9,919
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Thanks for the share.

    Since the hormones are taken from the amniotic fluid, can they say that they are the mother's hormones? How much of these hormones could be made directly by the baby?
    Jessica (32) and Ryan (32). Madelyn born August 5, 2009; Malachi born December 23, 2010 and Nathaniel born July 19, 2013. Lost a loved baby 02/29/12, 05/14/12 and 07/05/12 all due a serious allergic reaction to fabric softener.
    My Ovulation Chart

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toeing the edge between sanity and insanity
    Posts
    30,541

    Default

    I have a SIL who is watching this research closely. Her husband (my brother) is on the spectrum and during fertility testing they went through was shown to have higher-than-average testosterone levels and she has PCOS and documented high levels of testosterone. She has worried that between the family history, the fact that they both have elevated male hormone levels and whatever else we don't know about autism, that it's an inevitability for their children (she's pregnant with their first right now). I am really so glad to see that these studies are going further on the genetic end of things and sort of lightening up on the environmental for now.

    Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In my head
    Posts
    11,871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JJorn View Post
    Thanks for the share.

    Since the hormones are taken from the amniotic fluid, can they say that they are the mother's hormones? How much of these hormones could be made directly by the baby?
    Excellent point.
    Me (39) DH (46) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    9,919
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I am also really glad that they are moving more towards genetics. As we have talked about before, it really seems that there is a strong genetic predisposition for autism spectrum disorders. Environmental might very well play a role but I very much doubt it is a cause.
    Jessica (32) and Ryan (32). Madelyn born August 5, 2009; Malachi born December 23, 2010 and Nathaniel born July 19, 2013. Lost a loved baby 02/29/12, 05/14/12 and 07/05/12 all due a serious allergic reaction to fabric softener.
    My Ovulation Chart

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In my head
    Posts
    11,871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JJorn View Post
    I am also really glad that they are moving more towards genetics. As we have talked about before, it really seems that there is a strong genetic predisposition for autism spectrum disorders. Environmental might very well play a role but I very much doubt it is a cause.
    I totally agree.
    Me (39) DH (46) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    14,336

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JJorn View Post
    I am also really glad that they are moving more towards genetics. As we have talked about before, it really seems that there is a strong genetic predisposition for autism spectrum disorders. Environmental might very well play a role but I very much doubt it is a cause.
    I think there is a very close link between environment and genetics. Environmental input can cause a gene to become activated. This is not just in regards to autism but many other diseases as well. I have read about similar lin between things like diabetes and Alzheimers (which is sometimes called type 3 diabetes). We all have the genes but the input we give our body (lifestyle choices, environment, etc.) may activate some and not the others.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toeing the edge between sanity and insanity
    Posts
    30,541

    Default

    ^^^I don't disagree with this. BUT I think it's imperative to understand the genetic content before laying so much on environment. The honest truth is that {using this for sake of example} the fumes from dry erase markers do not CAUSE autism. I think we all can agree that it would be absurd to allege that. BUT I know at least three children where those fumes TRIGGER (or activate) their autism. One in particular who has such a crazy metamorphosis for him the second he's in a room with uncapped dry erase pens. I have seen it. But even his mother won't ever tell you that these pens caused him to have autism. This is the same principle as people seeing drastic results with diet. I hate hearing the word "cured" being thrown around when a mom has identified her child's specific triggers. GF/CF/preservative free diets don't CURE a child's autism. They remove triggers and therefore change the day to day effects. But we don't say insulin and specific diets have cured diabetes so...

    Understanding and hopefully being more able to identify the genetic portion will go further in allowing the environmental triggers to be understood and properly placed into perspective without the mass hysteria shifting from one component to the next every three years as research shifts.

    Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In my head
    Posts
    11,871

    Default

    Perfectly said, Tif.
    Me (39) DH (46) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DucksLikeRain View Post
    ^^^I don't disagree with this. BUT I think it's imperative to understand the genetic content before laying so much on environment. The honest truth is that {using this for sake of example} the fumes from dry erase markers do not CAUSE autism. I think we all can agree that it would be absurd to allege that. BUT I know at least three children where those fumes TRIGGER (or activate) their autism. One in particular who has such a crazy metamorphosis for him the second he's in a room with uncapped dry erase pens. I have seen it. But even his mother won't ever tell you that these pens caused him to have autism. This is the same principle as people seeing drastic results with diet. I hate hearing the word "cured" being thrown around when a mom has identified her child's specific triggers. GF/CF/preservative free diets don't CURE a child's autism. They remove triggers and therefore change the day to day effects. But we don't say insulin and specific diets have cured diabetes so...

    Understanding and hopefully being more able to identify the genetic portion will go further in allowing the environmental triggers to be understood and properly placed into perspective without the mass hysteria shifting from one component to the next every three years as research shifts.
    Very well said especially the bold part. I think genetics should be the first thing the look into. I am not a scientist but even as a causal observer I see many
    family members of mine share characteristics of the spectrum on some level. I am sure its genetic not to rule out environmental though.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •