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Thread: Music Class for preschool age

  1. #1

    Default Music Class for preschool age

    Has anyone put their preschooler into music classes? DS is 3 1/2 yrs and I am contemplating putting him in a class. I'm a little concerned that he may have taken after his father who is musically challenged and I am curious that if he were to start early that he might have a chance to overcome that.

    Thoughts? Experiences?

    Thanks!
    ~Jenn~ Mom to Ethan - my heart surgery survivor - born 6/29/09

  2. #2

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    What kind of music class? Like piano lessons or some musical instrument? As part of a preschool curriculum? My DS is 3 and they integrate music into his schooling at the Montessori school he attends. He loves singing songs.
    Vicki 39 DH45 SD12 SS9
    DS Hudson Sept 23, 2009!
    DS Trevor July 29, 2012!
    "Fat babies have no pride" - Lyle Lovett

  3. #3

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    There is a class called Music Together--you might want to see if there is one near you, but it does require parent involvement-singing and movement so if you're not into that you might not want to.

    Other than that I would probably not worry about it; starting in K (if you are not sending him to preschool) they do a lot of singing and music class. You might just want to sing to him and play a lot of music at home.

  4. #4

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    We love Music Together!


  5. #5

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    We go to a music class through a local program. It sounds similar to Music Together. I would absolutely put a preschooler in a music class! I would choose one that incorporates some movement and exploration of instruments. Our program has a curriculum, so they are introduced to basic musical terms (rhythm, presto, largo, etc) and other concepts, like counting, are incorporated. The class we attend is a family class, so I go with both boys (4 and 22 months) and they both LOVE it! DS1 even plays "Makin Music" at home where he sings all the songs and gives out the instruments, puts them back, etc. The music we learn is mostly original with some traditional songs. My oldest can sing all of them, and pretty well, and DS2 sings right along the best he can. We get a CD with every session, and it is all we listen to at home and in the car. DS1 will even sing to himself if there is no music on. I highly recommend trying out a music class!

    This company has also begun offering very beginner private lessons for 4-6 year olds for 30 minutes. According to the site, they will be introduced to different instruments and learning some basic things. We are considering enrolling DS1 in this soon for two reasons. One, because he absoultely loves music and has expressed an interest in learning how to play the guitar. And two, he really struggles with being left with someone other than me, like a teacher. He knows the woman who teaches, so it would be a good way to ease into having him be taught by someone else without me around. I would not put a child any younger into formal lessons, and at this age, I would really only do it if there was an expressed interest.

    My program offers free trials, so maybe you could look into that? We also go to story hour at the library. We have gone to several story hours at different libraries, and a few of them do songs in between stories. If you don't do a class, perhaps you could find something similar?

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    DD has music classes (movement and play based) at her Montessori. She loves, loves, loves, music, and I have been considering doing something more with her as well (she is not quite 3). When we go to Costco, she hangs out by the guitar and keyboards and "plays" them, bangs on her tiny little piano, and tells me that she is doing her Do-Re-Mi. She has basically grown up with lots of music, and there is always something playing in the car when she's in it. She listens to more music on the iPad (Western, Indian, and everything in between).

    Besides something like Music Together (they have CDs out as well), you can also check into what your Parks and Rec Dept. offers. The ones around here have music classes for the younger set.

  7. #7

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    As a former music teacher (strings and choir, as well as classes for young children) I agree with the above. Music Together and other unstructured "singing and movement" classes are great for preschoolers and tons of fun. Around 5 or 6, some children have enough dexterity to start piano lessons, or more structured singing classes. A few children will be able to handle another instrument, like violin or guitar, but for most kids it is better to wait until 3rd or 4th grade for those (exception would be a child who shows a lot of musical ability coupled with manual dexterity and interest).

    Aside from parent participation classes, tot choirs, etc., there are a lot of things you can do with your child at home to encourage an ear for (and love of) music and rhythm.

    -- Play music every day -- all different styles. Classical, world music from all traditions, country, pop. Get her ear accustomed to hearing and grooving with lots of different rhythmic and tonal structures, and talk about how the music sounds, what instruments might be making those sounds, how the music makes her feel.

    -- Sing songs every day with your child. It doesn't matter if you don't think you have a "good" voice. Sing out! Have fun with it. Learn different kinds of songs -- motion songs like the Hokey Pokey, lullabies, silly songs, lots of folk songs.

    -- Dance! Young kids really like using props, like ribbons, scarves or streamers (make great ones with a few colors of paper streamers, about 5 feet long, taped to a popsicle stick). They also like keeping a balloon in the air to the music. Encourage the child to close her eyes and move in the way the music makes her feel, or wave her scarf or streamer to the music.

    -- Instruments for kids to play music on at home are great -- a little keyboard, xylophone, harmonica, wooden or penny whistle, and especially lots of rhythm instruments. Let her experiment with the sounds. Encourage her to sing along. It doesn't matter what it sounds like - it's all about the expression. Play rhythm games, like clapping hands or rhythm sticks to music (either while singing or to recorded music). Starting around age 2, the "echo" game is really fun: You each have a set of rhythm sticks, a shaker or just hands to clap. You hit out a simple rhythm, and the child follows you. Sing songs that have rhythmic parts, like "BINGO," using rhythm sticks or shakers. You can make shakers at home with plastic Easter eggs -- put in a little scoop of rice or beans, close and tape around the seam. You can make other rhythm instruments at home too, like big shakers or rainmakers out of plastic water bottles, rhythm sticks out of craft dowels, drums from empty oatmeal canisters. I would recommend, though, investing a few dollars in some nicer rhythm instruments if you can. Nice wooden rhythm sticks are only a few dollars a pair, and they're so great to have (get several sets). A sturdy, real drum - like a buffalo or bodhran drum - is good too. Wooden tamborines, xylophones, etc. will always sound better than plastic and will encourage your child to play them (although a metal xylophone, called a glockenspiel, also makes a nice sound).

    ETA: One thing I forgot to mention -- take your kids to concerts!!! All kinds. Symphonies and operas often have kids' day matinees, where they don't expect kids to sit super quietly. Museums and other cultural institutions often have folk music or jazz concerts where it's ok if people wander while the music is playing. So do libraries. Concerts in the park are fantastic in the summer, usually free, and can range in style from classical to rock. Look at your local independent newspapers for listings.
    Last edited by pepperlru; 11-30-2012 at 04:04 PM.
    -- mom to DD1 1/98 and DD2 10/09


  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by pepperlru View Post
    As a former music teacher (strings and choir, as well as classes for young children) I agree with the above. Music Together and other unstructured "singing and movement" classes are great for preschoolers and tons of fun. Around 5 or 6, some children have enough dexterity to start piano lessons, or more structured singing classes. A few children will be able to handle another instrument, like violin or guitar, but for most kids it is better to wait until 3rd or 4th grade for those (exception would be a child who shows a lot of musical ability coupled with manual dexterity and interest).

    Aside from parent participation classes, tot choirs, etc., there are a lot of things you can do with your child at home to encourage an ear for (and love of) music and rhythm.

    -- Play music every day -- all different styles. Classical, world music from all traditions, country, pop. Get her ear accustomed to hearing and grooving with lots of different rhythmic and tonal structures, and talk about how the music sounds, what instruments might be making those sounds, how the music makes her feel.

    -- Sing songs every day with your child. It doesn't matter if you don't think you have a "good" voice. Sing out! Have fun with it. Learn different kinds of songs -- motion songs like the Hokey Pokey, lullabies, silly songs, lots of folk songs.

    -- Dance! Young kids really like using props, like ribbons, scarves or streamers (make great ones with a few colors of paper streamers, about 5 feet long, taped to a popsicle stick). They also like keeping a balloon in the air to the music. Encourage the child to close her eyes and move in the way the music makes her feel, or wave her scarf or streamer to the music.

    -- Instruments for kids to play music on at home are great -- a little keyboard, xylophone, harmonica, wooden or penny whistle, and especially lots of rhythm instruments. Let her experiment with the sounds. Encourage her to sing along. It doesn't matter what it sounds like - it's all about the expression. Play rhythm games, like clapping hands or rhythm sticks to music (either while singing or to recorded music). Starting around age 2, the "echo" game is really fun: You each have a set of rhythm sticks, a shaker or just hands to clap. You hit out a simple rhythm, and the child follows you. Sing songs that have rhythmic parts, like "BINGO," using rhythm sticks or shakers. You can make shakers at home with plastic Easter eggs -- put in a little scoop of rice or beans, close and tape around the seam. You can make other rhythm instruments at home too, like big shakers or rainmakers out of plastic water bottles, rhythm sticks out of craft dowels, drums from empty oatmeal canisters. I would recommend, though, investing a few dollars in some nicer rhythm instruments if you can. Nice wooden rhythm sticks are only a few dollars a pair, and they're so great to have (get several sets). A sturdy, real drum - like a buffalo or bodhran drum - is good too. Wooden tamborines, xylophones, etc. will always sound better than plastic and will encourage your child to play them (although a metal xylophone, called a glockenspiel, also makes a nice sound).
    Yes, yes, yes!!! Fantastic advice in this post
    Karen (28), DF (28), DD (3), DS (2 months)


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