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Thread: Secular Confessions

  1. #9781
    shutterbird Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janeen View Post
    Nooooooooooooooo, I've never heard of that! Tonight is the very first night I have noticed any swelling.
    It does happen. My feet swelled so badly at 16 weeks (stupid friend refused to turn on the AC in 90* weather while we were visiting) and I ended up getting a few stretch marks on my ankles. I'm really prone to them, though. You should see my belly!

  2. #9782
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    3andMe is offline Every day is a gift. It's just... does it have to be a pair of socks? Hopelessly Devoted
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    Quote Originally Posted by atenielle View Post
    Audri said her first complete sentence today!!!! My jaw nearly dropped to the floor!!

    She's been saying a few words together as simple sentences (Milk, please... etc) but today she walked up to us (my mom and me) and says "I need to poop!"
    That is an absolutely wonderful first sentence! She is brilliant!

    I've had cankles for weeks. DH shuddered when I took my socks off after our road trip.


  3. #9783

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    Crap. Literally. Something is wrong with the toilet/plumbing downstairs in the daycare and it looks like it's going to be an expensive and messy job. I think I have to have the kids up in my home today. And of coure, it's thunder and lightening today so we can't spend the day outside.
    Ugh.

  4. #9784

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    Quote Originally Posted by atenielle View Post
    Audri said her first complete sentence today!!!! My jaw nearly dropped to the floor!!

    She's been saying a few words together as simple sentences (Milk, please... etc) but today she walked up to us (my mom and me) and says "I need to poop!"
    That's awesome! Josh didn't say that until, oh, a week ago. LOL

  5. #9785
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    I hear you on the cankles Janeen. Mine aren't that bad yet - but if they're as bad as they are now at 30 weeks, I'm a little frightened to know what they're going to look like in 10 more weeks.


    I just started a book called "God is Not Great" explores how religion ruins things. lol. I think. I'll give some more details as I get further in. I don't necessarily think religion ruins things - so I'm interested to see this author's take on it.
    Just Midge

  6. #9786

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    I confess I miss you all. Can't imagine how many things I've missed reading about and I just don't have the energy to read the last 10 pages or so. The entire month of March I have been doing tasks in my new position at the University while still doing all of the old parts of my job TOO. They finally switched our campus over to the hotline on 31 Mar and I turned all my credit card stuff over to the central ladies on the 1st. But I've been getting them caught up on our methods and sending them spreadsheets. I think I'm finally done.

    I confess this AF has me bleeding like a stuck pig and cramping so bad it reminds me of my teenage years. I'd love to be home right now curled up in a ball around a heating pad. PP bleeding wasn't THIS bad. OOH I wish I had one of those mama pads the hospital stocks.
    Krista & Jonathan: Liam, our one and only, born 9 Sep 2008



  7. #9787

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    Yay for "I have to poop!"

    Not so great about the poopy potty, Bridget.

    And cankles - gah. Last time I ended up with one little stretch mark on my FOOT but it was because of PP bloating from the IV saline, so I'm hoping NOT to have that happen this time. No IVs where I'm birthing, save for emergency purposes

    Thanks for the advice guys, I think I'm going to shorten his lessons. He really LOVES parts of it and is so proud of himself, and is REALLY doing well. I'm not down with completely ditching an effort on account of attitude if the learning and the INTEREST is really there. Nearly four years old is not too young to learn that sometimes things that you really want to do take a little work. Don't get me wrong, I'm not a hardass at all, but Oscar learns quickly that he can avoid anything that smells like effort by whining (we've had this happen before). I need to make it more fun, and somewhat less effort/attention time for him. It involves more work for ME to do it this way and not just "give up," but that's parenting, right? So time for mama to get her groove on and make this stuff fun again.

    He already has "designated work time" each day (his work is learning, he loves that idea) and does great with it. Draws, does letters, shapes, etc. It's just this sitting still and watching thing that gets him after 5 minutes or so. So we'll make it less than five minutes a day and see how it flies.



  8. #9788
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    Quote Originally Posted by daylilies View Post
    Yuck!
    To keep the bug theme going...ladybugs are all over our curtains again (there were like 30 of them one day last fall). Ew ew ew
    I bet that those aren't lady bugs but the Japenese ones. They stink if you squish them (even in a tissue your hands still smell blech!) and once in a while one of those suckers will bite you! They like warmth and are attracted to lighter colors. I HATE them and we have issues every year for a month or two in the fall. I hate to use it but we had to spray around the door fram and windows with poison every fall and that helps for a while. Otherwise I end up with like 50 in them crawling around and flying around my house.

    Jennifer, 35, DH 36

  9. #9789

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    I'd be OK with ladybugs - they're on my short list of "Crawly Things I'm OK With". (Spiders are NOT on the list). Though I don't think I'd want that many on my curtains INSIDE the house.
    Krista & Jonathan: Liam, our one and only, born 9 Sep 2008



  10. #9790

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    Yeah, it was pretty gross. (I think you're right, I think they are the Japanese ones) I did not enjoy walking up the stairs and turning the corner to see that. I have to admit I shut the door and did not go in there again until DH came home. My list of crawly things I'm okay with is really short, too.
    Speaking of creepy...there is an open journal on livejournal I'm obsessed with. It's all about supernatural and other creepy things (like bugs, lol). It is very very explicit. There are no rules on what you can and can't post, from videos to creepy stories to gifs and pictures. I've had a rough time sleeping because of it, but I just can't look away. Is there something wrong with me? I am just fascinated with the unknown and strange stories.

  11. #9791

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    I confess I love crawly things.



  12. #9792

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    I am liking bugs more now that I have Savana. She just gets such enjoyment out of learning about them that I'm becoming fascinated myself. She loves spiders. So I'm not even permitted to squish them. They must be taken outside.
    I confess I'm taking my mom shopping tonite so she can find some new clothes that are more comfortable for her. I'm nervous. I have not taken her out without my dad since she's become less steady on her feet and lost some minor brain function. It's such a fine line between helping her and offending her and I don't know if I'm emotionally capable of dealing with her getting mad at me.
    I confess that I got a scathing look from my sil when she heard Savana telling my mom's friend that "Mommy is the Easter Bunny". I wanted to stick my tongue out at her but instead I promised her that Savana would not say anything to other kids. She looked at me like I'd just killed my child's puppy. What am I going to do? Savana made this decision on her own and point blank asked me if the Easter Bunny was real or pretend and I'm not going to outright lie to her and try to convince her that he's real.

  13. #9793

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    Bridget, we had the same issue with Santa. Oscar point blank told a little girl's mom, in front of the little girl (about age 5) that "Santa was pretend." In my opinion, it's what parents risk when they lie to their children. Sorry, but it's true... tell your kid that storks deliver babies and you set them up badly for hearing the truth, whether it comes sooner or later.

    We just finished Oscar's lessons today and he did SO great. We worked together to cut out some of the more mundane "tasks" from his reading lessons and only did the interesting/useful stuff and he did GREAT and was so proud!



  14. #9794
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    Quote Originally Posted by stash View Post
    We just finished Oscar's lessons today and he did SO great. We worked together to cut out some of the more mundane "tasks" from his reading lessons and only did the interesting/useful stuff and he did GREAT and was so proud!
    That's great! At his age, it's really all about making it engaging. I'm more than certain he's capable of doing anything you ask him.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  15. #9795

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    Josh is so funny. He drew a T today, but he drew it upside down. When he realized it, he said "Well I can just turn the paper around"

  16. #9796
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    Quote Originally Posted by daylilies View Post
    Josh is so funny. He drew a T today, but he drew it upside down. When he realized it, he said "Well I can just turn the paper around"
    Cute!
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  17. #9797

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    Quote Originally Posted by daylilies View Post
    Josh is so funny. He drew a T today, but he drew it upside down. When he realized it, he said "Well I can just turn the paper around"
    Oscar writes his C's backwards, his S's look like Z's, it's all kinda funny when he writes his name (in a circle, basically). But I'm all like "that's GREAT Oscar!" I mean I say "hey cool, that's a great backwards C" but in my opinion the fact that he's trying is what counts at this age.



  18. #9798
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    Quote Originally Posted by stash View Post
    Oscar writes his C's backwards, his S's look like Z's, it's all kinda funny when he writes his name (in a circle, basically). But I'm all like "that's GREAT Oscar!" I mean I say "hey cool, that's a great backwards C" but in my opinion the fact that he's trying is what counts at this age.
    That's awesome. Kids reverse letters pretty commonly even in 1st grade and it's totally developmentally appropriate. They don't see it as backwards until they're a little older.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  19. #9799

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    I think it's awesome he's trying too. He loves to say "My name is Joshua and it has a U" LOL

  20. #9800
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    I've had this sneaking suspicion that it doesn't even register with them when something is upside-down. Like they can hold books and pictures upside down, and my kids still can't tell the difference between 6s and 9s. Maybe their brains just don't notice the right way up. It takes time to realize that things are supposed to be a certain orientation or direction. I can actually still read pretty easily upside-down, and it's not something I had to work at.

    My dad did an experiment in college (they were broke and did a lot of this type of stuff) where he had to wear glasses that turned everything upside-down in his visual fields. The first week or two, he kept stumbling into stuff because it was all upside-down. After that, his brain rewired (so quickly!) and everything looked right-side-up again. He kept wearing them, and when he took them off eventually at the end of the experiment all of the normal world looked upside-down to him for a few weeks.

    I haven't read anything to back that up, but I think some things are just less concrete, and a little more... loose in childhood. One thing semi-related but not entirely is hearing about how common synesthesia is in children (it's basically mixing senses, but many times it's associating colors with numbers and letters). It is assumed that this may be a normal thing and that people just outgrow it. Interestingly, my dh still has this although it's faded as he's gotten older. If he pictures numbers and letters in his head, they'll be in specific colors--for example the number 4 is associated with lime green for him. He's also incredibly amazingly good at math. He can do long complex equations in his head as long as I don't try to talk to him at the same time.


  21. #9801
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lydia View Post
    I've had this sneaking suspicion that it doesn't even register with them when something is upside-down. Like they can hold books and pictures upside down, and my kids still can't tell the difference between 6s and 9s. Maybe their brains just don't notice the right way up. It takes time to realize that things are supposed to be a certain orientation or direction. I can actually still read pretty easily upside-down, and it's not something I had to work at.
    You're exactly right - it takes the developing brain a while to register how things are oriented. Same/different is also a major developmental concept that takes some time. One big thing from a literacy perspective is that often kids without a lot of home support come to kindergarten not knowing how to hold a book - which way is up or down. Other kids can already read and quite well. The kids who can't even distinguish up or down are at such a disadvantage considering how much ground they have to cover to catch up with their classmates.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lydia View Post
    My dad did an experiment in college (they were broke and did a lot of this type of stuff) where he had to wear glasses that turned everything upside-down in his visual fields. The first week or two, he kept stumbling into stuff because it was all upside-down. After that, his brain rewired (so quickly!) and everything looked right-side-up again. He kept wearing them, and when he took them off eventually at the end of the experiment all of the normal world looked upside-down to him for a few weeks.

    I haven't read anything to back that up, but I think some things are just less concrete, and a little more... loose in childhood. One thing semi-related but not entirely is hearing about how common synesthesia is in children (it's basically mixing senses, but many times it's associating colors with numbers and letters). It is assumed that this may be a normal thing and that people just outgrow it. Interestingly, my dh still has this although it's faded as he's gotten older. If he pictures numbers and letters in his head, they'll be in specific colors--for example the number 4 is associated with lime green for him. He's also incredibly amazingly good at math. He can do long complex equations in his head as long as I don't try to talk to him at the same time.
    Soo interesting about your dad's experiment!
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  22. #9802

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    I was always bad at math. I remember in first grade that I had a hard time doing the problems because each number had it's own personality, so of course in my equations, a 2 and a 7 would not be next to each other because they were so different and would never be friends. 2 was boring. 7 was fun and exciting but in the end unpredictable and a mystery (kind of a loner). The number 9 was worse than 7 . Sounds silly, but it made math difficult because I got everything wrong all the time and it has never changed to this day. I still need a calculator to subtract. I can't carry numbers because I don't know where to set them down again. One of my favorite jokes from my old stand-up comedy days was from a friend of mine Eddie (who works at Tosh 2.0 now - funny show if you get a chance): "If it wasn't for math, I'd be the funniest guy at Nasa! How much gas will it take to get the shuttle to Mars? I'd top 'er off! Fill it up and bring an extra gas can in the trunk."

    Oh, and names and words are always pictures in my head. Lydia is eyelashes. Linda is the floaty fluttery scarf that hangs off of princess cone hats (and generally blue). Barbara is short frosted hair. Sam is a 2x4 wood board. Etc.
    Last edited by girlwonder; 04-06-2010 at 10:18 PM.

    "Any idiot can face a crisis; it is this day-to-day living that wears you out." -Anton Chekhov


  23. #9803
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    Quote Originally Posted by katycat24 View Post
    I was always bad at math. I remember in first grade that I had a hard time doing the problems because each number had it's own personality, so of course in my equations, a 2 and a 7 would not be next to each other because they were so different and would never be friends. 2 was boring. 7 was fun and exciting but in the end unpredictable and a mystery (kind of a loner). The number 9 was worse than 7 . Sounds silly, but it made math difficult because I got everything wrong all the time and it has never changed to this day. I still need a calculator to subtract. I can't carry numbers because I don't know where to set them down again. One of my favorite jokes from my old stand-up comedy days was from a friend of mine Eddie (who works at Tosh 2.0 now - funny show if you get a chance): "If it wasn't for math, I'd be the funniest guy at Nasa! How much gas will it take to get the shuttle to Mars? I'd top 'er off! Fill it up and bring an extra gas can in the trunk."
    Okay, that's synesthesia ... so interesting!
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  24. #9804

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    Definitely a mild case, but I think it is just a bit. And more important/intense when I was little.

    "Any idiot can face a crisis; it is this day-to-day living that wears you out." -Anton Chekhov


  25. #9805
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    Were you really sensitive to sound / touch / light / food etc? I'm guessing you are sensitive to color or visual input as you're an artist.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  26. #9806

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    Argh!!! I wish people wouldn't post horrific things in the titles of their posts!!! I don't want to read stories of terrible things!!! All I did was go the the New Posts link and now my head just gets assaulted with all the bad things in the world that I cannot flippin' deal with. That's why I don't have CNN for goodness sake. Seriously, though - isn't there a thing somewhere that says not to do that? Am I just making that up?

    "Any idiot can face a crisis; it is this day-to-day living that wears you out." -Anton Chekhov


  27. #9807
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    Yeah, I think there is. That stuff is supposed to be in Ranting/Venting with a caution in the title, I thought.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  28. #9808

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwennero View Post
    Were you really sensitive to sound / touch / light / food etc? I'm guessing you are sensitive to color or visual input as you're an artist.
    You know, I don't remember feeling like I was different from other kids until maybe jr. high, when all of my friends were able to listen to the radio and talk on the phone at the same time and I simply could not do it. Of course, looking back I guess I can see things that I was sensitive too- I couldn't eat certain vegetables at all (vegetable textures like peppers and onions still make me shudder, and badly fitting clothes make me so crazy I have to go home and change). Hmm. I will have to ask my mom if she remembers anything like that.

    "Any idiot can face a crisis; it is this day-to-day living that wears you out." -Anton Chekhov


  29. #9809
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    I have a lot of that sensory stuff, too. I remember having huge fights with my brother because he was always listening to the radio and I couldn't read with the radio on. I'm better now but sometimes I'll still pause my Ipod if I want to concentrate on something. I also am really sensitive to texture in food (it's almost more important to me than taste) and I have clothing issues, too. Like I hate t-shirts with tight necks. I really struggled as a child but only recently was able to look back and realize what the problem was.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  30. #9810
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    Quote Originally Posted by katycat24 View Post
    You know, I don't remember feeling like I was different from other kids until maybe jr. high, when all of my friends were able to listen to the radio and talk on the phone at the same time and I simply could not do it. Of course, looking back I guess I can see things that I was sensitive too- I couldn't eat certain vegetables at all (vegetable textures like peppers and onions still make me shudder, and badly fitting clothes make me so crazy I have to go home and change). Hmm. I will have to ask my mom if she remembers anything like that.
    Dude, sounds just like me! I'm horrible at math as well, especially fractions and adding/subtracting big numbers in my head.

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