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Thread: Secular Confessions

  1. #42121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmosmom View Post
    I would definitely want to have clearly (and you are of course always tactful!) explained why you are concerned and how those reasons lead you to believe what you do. And definitely mention ways that he could be helped. I haven't looked into that at all really and my first thought was so what if he's aspergers....can't do anything about that. But clearly there are things that they can do to help. I would want to know that my kid wasn't just getting a label but that there was help.

    Makes me wonder how many of those kids in school way back when had something like that. I think pretty much most us have had classes growing up and there was always the kid or two kids that were just different. Something beyond shy.
    I guarantee those kids were out there, and we see them and work with them and in some cases live with them. I look back at my dad and his family and I know two of his siblings have it just from characteristics I have observed over the years, and his nephew as well. Nobody knew anything about those things back then. My aunt was actually diagnosed with schizophrenia but I don't think looking back that was the case. I think it was Asperger's. Apparently back in the day that was a common misdiagnosis. She did end up committing suicide. http://www.tonyattwood.com.au/index....&id=120:adults

    And see, with the bolded ... that's a sore spot for me. People don't say you can't do anything about Autism, or OCD, or ADD, or any other developmental condition. Why do we (as a culture, not you specifically) think it's okay to give up on people and think there is nothing we can do? There's lots of stuff we can do for all kinds of things and we are learning more every day. Goes back to the difference between any physical disability (i.e. wheelchair) vs. mental disability. We need to stop discriminating. Maybe you can't fix a problem, but you can learn to live with it.
    Last edited by Gwenn; 06-17-2013 at 02:33 PM.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  2. #42122
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    Oh yeah I totally agree with you. it was just my first thought...as someone who hasn't had a reason to ever look up and really read about aspergers....was, oh I didn't realize that there was something that should or could be done to help. I knew enough to know it was part of the very high functioning autism but that was about it. And that we have a good number of books on it because we have seen requests for the topic, especially from the consumer level go way up the past few years. But I think my boss must have done all the requests on that.
    But absolutely if there are techniques that can help....they should be done.

    Jennifer, 35, DH 36

  3. #42123
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    Mandy, I would definitely tell them, even at the risk of damaging your relationship. If you don't, and something bad happens to this child down the road, you will never forgive yourself.

    I think that it is a good plan to approach almost SIL. Not so much because you want to address the concerns with her, but because you can talk to her about your concerns about the child, and about your concerns about approaching your brother, and formulate a plan for how to approach it. One thing I would not do is to let her bring this up with him. And I totally agree that you need to approach this as a solvable problem, one that would enable A to succeed in life. And maybe give him insight into why he might struggle with stuff that don't seem like a big deal to other kids.

  4. #42124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suja View Post
    Mandy, I would definitely tell them, even at the risk of damaging your relationship. If you don't, and something bad happens to this child down the road, you will never forgive yourself.

    I think that it is a good plan to approach almost SIL. Not so much because you want to address the concerns with her, but because you can talk to her about your concerns about the child, and about your concerns about approaching your brother, and formulate a plan for how to approach it. One thing I would not do is to let her bring this up with him. And I totally agree that you need to approach this as a solvable problem, one that would enable A to succeed in life. And maybe give him insight into why he might struggle with stuff that don't seem like a big deal to other kids.
    Thank you. I'm not crazy, am I? Reading what I wrote about him - am I the only one who is concerned about it?
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

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    I'm not qualified to answer whether you're crazy or not in general, but in this case, not at all. A might thank you for it later, if not using words, but by being successful in life.

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    Yes and no. it's hard to tell based on reading and part of what my problem with aspergers is (not that I have a problem with it but more difficulty) is that the symptoms are such in it's hard to tell what is normal or not. I mean the food thing....I wouldn't see it as that weird because I was a very picky eater until I was an adult. My sister is just now branching out. But our dad is super picky and we grew up eating cheeseburgers, spaghetti, pizza and kraft mac and cheese with a handful of other things.
    Sensory issues....again something I know a lot of people have to an extent. My sister couldn't stand elastic around her wrists or neck.
    Social issues...yeah I know a lot of people who are shy or come off strange because they are shy.
    Obsessiveness....I especially think this is a boy thing. I know my DH would spend 8 hours or more playing nintendo if he was allowed. Even now he can spend hours doing the same thing and gets on streaks of obessiveness with a computer game. Than reading. Back to computers, on to legos. Where I like to do something for 1-2 hours and do something different.

    so I can see parents not seeing it in their kids. It's like you have behaviors that many people exhibit but it's just a lot more extreme and maybe the clustering of behaviors.

    At first I was reading what you wrote and was like yeah so. But I kept reading and it was the amount of behaviors that seem to suggest a problem. And especially given the family history, even more so.

    Jennifer, 35, DH 36

  7. #42127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmosmom View Post
    Yes and no. it's hard to tell based on reading and part of what my problem with aspergers is (not that I have a problem with it but more difficulty) is that the symptoms are such in it's hard to tell what is normal or not. I mean the food thing....I wouldn't see it as that weird because I was a very picky eater until I was an adult. My sister is just now branching out. But our dad is super picky and we grew up eating cheeseburgers, spaghetti, pizza and kraft mac and cheese with a handful of other things.
    Sensory issues....again something I know a lot of people have to an extent. My sister couldn't stand elastic around her wrists or neck.
    Social issues...yeah I know a lot of people who are shy or come off strange because they are shy.
    Obsessiveness....I especially think this is a boy thing. I know my DH would spend 8 hours or more playing nintendo if he was allowed. Even now he can spend hours doing the same thing and gets on streaks of obessiveness with a computer game. Than reading. Back to computers, on to legos. Where I like to do something for 1-2 hours and do something different.

    so I can see parents not seeing it in their kids. It's like you have behaviors that many people exhibit but it's just a lot more extreme and maybe the clustering of behaviors.

    At first I was reading what you wrote and was like yeah so. But I kept reading and it was the amount of behaviors that seem to suggest a problem. And especially given the family history, even more so.
    See, I actually think this post is pretty revealing. Like, back when you or your dad were kids, people didn't know anything about this stuff but I don't think the extreme food issues would be considered within the range of normal behavior but you all seem to have made it through and you are even branching out now that you are an adult. I actually have a lot of the sensory stuff myself. I'm convinced I should have had occupational therapy as a child. But I'm not quite bad enough to qualify for a diagnosis myself.

    And the obsessiveness - it isn't a boy thing. My dad does it (that's one of the many reasons why I think he is on the spectrum) but my brother doesn't, and my DH doesn't, and none of the other guys I've dated do, either. I actually am much more obsessive - it's one of the ways I'm borderline Asperger's myself. But I don't think it's normal. DH DOES have his very specific interests - he is into martial arts, and cross fit, and cooking, and history, and music, and lots of other stuff - and he spends a lot of time on the internet - but he isn't obsessive about it the way I am. He takes breaks, and he doesn't dominate conversations with it, and he doesn't expect people around him to be interested in what he is interested in, although we do have discussions about it. And he does spend a lot of time working out and I get mad at him over it sometimes - but it's for a purpose. He has to keep in shape for his National Guard stuff and when he gets a chance to take a step back, he does. My brother is the same way. I actually can spend 8 hours playing Sims when I have time to do so, and I don't look up from what I'm doing unless DH or the dogs make me. My dad will spend 8 hours researching something and never look up.

    In an adult, though, like my dad who has a marriage that is working and a good job (now retired) and he's not missing out on anything in life - I actually agree with you, shrug my shoulders and say "So what? No big deal. We're all different." But I do worry about an adolescent just entering high school who is showing SO many problems.
    Last edited by Gwenn; 06-17-2013 at 03:40 PM.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  8. #42128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suja View Post
    I'm not qualified to answer whether you're crazy or not in general, but in this case, not at all. A might thank you for it later, if not using words, but by being successful in life.
    I probably am crazy, in answer to that question. See my comment above.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

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    I thought I'd just randomly put in this stuff about kiddie school drama. There is one little girl in Mira's class that is clearly, ahead of the pack. She is physically a big kid, and in her skills, at least a year ahead of the others. She reads, she writes, and from what I've seen of her, exceedingly mature. Her parents are putting her in a school for gifted kids. At 3 years old. They are extremely hard to get into, and the kid has to pass a test. According to the parent, the school is pretty much all computerized. As in, all the kids get their own iPads, kind of computerized, and they do all their work on computers. Mira's teacher is upset. According to her, she is the one who is supposed to teach the advanced kids (not sure why she got that impression; she is supposed to teach the kids whose parents agree with the Montessori philosophy and have the money). According to the kid's mom, her kid is so vastly ahead of everyone else, she is bored. I don't think she is so far ahead of everyone else that a teacher who normally teaches 3-6 year olds cannot keep her challenged.

  10. #42130
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    I think most people have quirks and aren't normal in some ways. I remember way back a while ago looking at the symptoms of aspergers (that was as far as I got) to see if that fit my DH. A few things I'm yeah he's got that symptom but most I'm like, no that sounds more extreme than what I see in him.
    I kind of thing quirks aren't a huge deal as long as you can work around them and live life. the bigger concern to me would not just being not so social but not being able to in general read emotions. And that is where I can say, no I don't think my dad or my DH has this....neither are all that social and are shy BUT they know emotions....if anything my DH is too sensitive to emotions.

    I also am not sure that it's that uncommon to get really into something (even I can lose hours and hours into the sims!) but it almost sounds like the obsession is one that most people wouldn't get into?

    I was using this for symptoms. http://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topi.../symptoms.aspx I would be concerned myself I think not by seeing a few symptoms in someone but seeing a large amount of them and seeing them being extreme.

    Jennifer, 35, DH 36

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    Suja, that's crazy. A bright three year old should be able to thrive in a Montessori for kids 3-6. I think the parents are just the type who is super-pushy and wants to talk about how far ahead their child is of everyone else. I can understand why Mira's teacher is feeling a little hurt.

    Jennifer, you are right. Really it's the degree of symptoms and how strong they are and whether they impact daily living that makes the difference at the end of the day. And in my nephew's case, I'm feeling like it really does impact daily living - if it is affecting what he will eat, who he will interact with, how much he is able to participate in school, etc. But obsessions can be about more normal things. Sometimes it's wacky stuff like washing machines but sometimes it's very age appropriate stuff like the latest cool video game. Just depends on the person. The degree of obsession is more important the the nature of the obsession.

    The emotional stuff is really hard to quantify. It has more to do with how they respond to other's emotions, and sometimes they can be super sensitive to how other people are feeling specifically because they had difficulty reading it accurately. So they are very concerned they upset you when what they said didn't upset you at all. Or they say something horrifying and don't care. Depends on the person. This is actually one area that generates a lot of confusion and misconceptions about autism, that people who have it are "cold" and "unemotional" when that really couldn't be further from the truth. It's just difficult for them to find the right way of dealing with emotion.

    And whew! Glad I'm not the only one who can lose time to the sims!

    ETA: This is the old DSM-IV Asperger's: http://www.autreat.com/dsm4-aspergers.html
    And the new DSM-V Autism, which took over in May: https://sfari.org/news-and-opinion/n...trum-disorders
    Last edited by Gwenn; 06-17-2013 at 04:23 PM.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  12. #42132

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    Jumping in after being gone for the weekend and missing tons of stuff --
    Mandy, just on the basis of having a 15 year old and having interacted with lots of her friends/classmates/etc over the years, neurotypical and not, I agree with Jennifer. The specific things you mention are very normal for many teenagers, including mine (she has worn two hospital bracelets until they literally fell off her wrist, and she will talk to you until you want to put your head through a wall just to make it stop about some of her interests without ever seeming to notice her listener's eyes glazing over). So having a few of those characteristics wouldn't be a red flag to me, but taken altogether, it certainly could be.
    The brightest flag I see in your post is that you said his peers want nothing to do with him. There are lots of kids who just can't seem to get it together socially, or who get picked on for one reason or another, but in observing lots of kids and teens over the years, it seems that if a kid really can't seem to find a group or a few peers he can interact with successfully, or even just one or two good friends, and he's the kind of kid others just seem to give a wide berth -- that's something to pay attention to. Even if it doesn't indicate Asperger's per se, it indicates a level of social inhibition that could definitely have lifelong effects (the kinds of effects you're worried about).

    I also agree with you that there are things that can be done, and I hope they will be for your nephew regardless of his official diagnosis. He doesn't have to be diagnosed with autism in order to benefit from someone acknowledging his organizational or social deficits, but with your brother not seeing a problem, it does present a sticky issue. I'm not sure how you can help his parents see an issue where they see none without causing offense. I remember reading on this board recently too about moms who would be offended if someone mentioned a delay or nontypical behavior in their child, even if the mom already knew it was an issue. Frankly I have a difficult time understanding this, although I am glad to have read their opinion so I know that some people feel this way. I don't know if it's the same for older kids, but I guess there are people who, even if they know their kids are different, don't want someone else to mention it. I don't know what one would do in that situation.
    -- mom to DD1 1/98 and DD2 10/09


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    Thanks, Gretchen. You cut right to the heart of it, really - the issue is that he is struggling and the other kids see something odd about it. MOST teenagers do weird stuff, we all know that. They're dysfunctional little beings, just because they are teenagers. But this didn't start when he became a teenager and he's always been different from the other kids around him. And it doesn't matter what the diagnosis truly is or ends up being, the issue is that he is struggling and someone should give him some help.

    And I saw that conversation, too, and had the same reaction you did. I wondered if it wasn't just because I don't have my own kids, and all moms would think differently - but apparently not.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  14. #42134

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    Nah. I think it would be a little odd to have to pretend something obvious didn't exist, although I'd certainly not bring up even an obvious difference with an acquaintance, neighbor, etc until they mentioned it. But with a very close friend or family member, where you saw the child often, it would be a real elephant in the room -- especially considering that they MAY not know it's an issue, and not to address it could be hurting the kid. I think in that situation I'd rather offend than chance the kid not getting services where they're needed, and I guess I'd hope the parents knew I was coming to them in love and concern, not judgment. I hope that if you do decide to talk to your nephew's parents, they know that's where you're coming from, too.
    -- mom to DD1 1/98 and DD2 10/09


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    I THINK they know that. I do think I might start by approaching my almost SIL and see how she takes it. I haven't spoken to A's mom since she and my brother divorced, and that was 8 or 9 years ago. So I have literally no idea what is going on in her head or what she is doing. I did hear through the grapevine that she told my brother that he needed to "deal with" A's problems in school and my brother had no idea how he was supposed to help since she has him during the school week. He tries the best he can. I really do think he's a caring, loving dad who does the best he knows how. And I think my almost-SIL is a little overwhelmed - loves A, wants to do what she can for him, and is 10 years younger than my brother so if A were her kid she would have been a pretty young mom. No experience with kids and met my brother when A was about 6 so has had to step into a parenting role for a kid she doesn't have full time and again, does the best she can. I know she worked hard to do a lot of things like sticker charts when he was younger because she was at her wit's end.
    Last edited by Gwenn; 06-17-2013 at 04:48 PM.
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  16. #42136

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    Janet, I'm sorry I missed the convo about Maiya. I did tell you I loved her story, right? She's so creative and spunky and cute. I did have some trouble understanding her on our recent visit, but mostly at first. As I became more familiar with her speech patterns, consonant switching, etc., I was able to get a lot more. She's very expressive, too, so that really helped. I haven't been around large numbers of little ones enough recently to judge whether or not it's typical, but Mandy sure knows her stuff! And L too.

    Mandy, regarding the mythical kid who says 'pasketti,' I had to laugh. Noe uses almost no "little-kid" words, but one she does say is "bisketti." I honestly don't even know why -- dh and dd1 prefer other forms of pasta, so we really don't even have spaghetti, and when we do I call it "noodles." On the way home from the river last night in the car we were going through an agricultural area and she was telling us what was growing in all the fields. There was a corn field, a pear field (I corrected her to "orchard" and dh got annoyed at me), a cereal field, and a bisketti field.
    -- mom to DD1 1/98 and DD2 10/09


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    Mmm... a bisketti field! Were there meatballs, too? For some reason that one seems to be a super common error.

    "Lellow" is another one. I have so many moms who make this very serious face and tell me their kid says, "lellow" and I'm like, "so what?" LOL! Or "wabbit." That's the worst! Doesn't every kid in the universe say "wabbit" at some point?
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

  18. #42138

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    There would be no meatballs in Noe's bisketti field. Something funny happened the other week. We were on the way home from a day trip and really hungry so I drove thru someplace, which is a pretty special treat. She asked me if she could have a cheeseburger. I asked her, with surprise, "Do you like cheeseburgers?" because she doesn't usually like meat and I've never seen her eat ground beef or steak. She said emphatically that she DID like cheeseburgers. So I said ok, and ordered her a little kid's cheeseburger. When it came, she eagerly opened the wrapper, took a bite, and got the strangest, most grossed-out look on her face. She opened up the burger, pointed at the meat and said "What is THAT?"
    Turns out she thought a cheeseburger was just cheese and bread. It was quite a shock to her to find a disk of brown, nasty stuff in there.

    I, on the other hand, adore cheeseburgers, but haven't had one in a year due to my stupid iron problem. I plan to mostly stay off red meat forever, but when I finish my treatments and on maintenance, I will be celebrating with the biggest, greasiest, cheesiest, dripping-with-grilled-onions burger I can find. It will probably give me a horrible stomachache, but it'll be worth it.
    -- mom to DD1 1/98 and DD2 10/09


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    Conner was put in some speech therapy this year. Not because he tested to the point where it was clearly necessary, but he was on the borderline I guess. So they did it as an "every little bit helps" situation. I was fine with it until he got angry every time we affectionately called him Nonner. That's how he referred to himself when he was very little and it became his nickname. Now, because of speech therapy at school, I'm not allowed to call him that. It still bugs me and it's been all school year!

    Mama to Bobbie 20 ~ Jesi 18 ~ Syd 14 ~ Conner 6
    I'm gonna be a Gramama! Jesi is due 11/22/13


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    I grew up with a dairy allergy, and I found there were certain things that were just worth the pain for me. Pizza and ice cream were worth it. Luckily I've pretty much outgrown it now and can eat it without pain.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

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    Quote Originally Posted by missychrissy View Post
    Conner was put in some speech therapy this year. Not because he tested to the point where it was clearly necessary, but he was on the borderline I guess. So they did it as an "every little bit helps" situation. I was fine with it until he got angry every time we affectionately called him Nonner. That's how he referred to himself when he was very little and it became his nickname. Now, because of speech therapy at school, I'm not allowed to call him that. It still bugs me and it's been all school year!
    That's stupid ... a nickname is a nickname, right? I would have a problem with that.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

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    This is such a great conversation. I have been keeping up during nursing sessions but HATE typing on my kindle, plus if I get too involved with it then Sawyer wants it, so have not been responding. But I think you have gotten great advice regarding your nephew and agree that there are very few cases where it's acceptable to point out to someone that something may be "off" but I do think that with all the variable of your situation, this seems like a case where you can bring it up but it is still so very delicate. I have faith you can do it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwenn View Post
    That's stupid ... a nickname is a nickname, right? I would have a problem with that.
    I don't think the speech therapist told Conner specifically not to say Nonner. At least, I hope not because I missed an opportunity to go all crazy-ass-mom on another school employee. I assumed that she thought Conner was mispronouncing his name due to his 'speech delay' and her simple coaching to get him to actually say his name correctly gave him the idea that Nonner shouldn't be said. Not purposefully though.

    Mama to Bobbie 20 ~ Jesi 18 ~ Syd 14 ~ Conner 6
    I'm gonna be a Gramama! Jesi is due 11/22/13


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    Quote Originally Posted by missychrissy View Post
    I don't think the speech therapist told Conner specifically not to say Nonner. At least, I hope not because I missed an opportunity to go all crazy-ass-mom on another school employee. I assumed that she thought Conner was mispronouncing his name due to his 'speech delay' and her simple coaching to get him to actually say his name correctly gave him the idea that Nonner shouldn't be said. Not purposefully though.
    I see what you are saying. Often people will pick up on kid's names as one of the first things to work on just to make life easier. I have known kids that couldn't say their names and yes, it's an appropriate thing to work on. But if he can say his name, but prefers the nickname, I would mention it to the speech therapist and ask her to pick another target because he is able to distinguish between the two and prefers his nickname. That's a choice he is allowed to make. If he was Billy she wouldn't force him to call himself William, right? I think I would have a polite chat (as opposed to a crazy-ass rant).

    I actually think I might pose this as a question in my SLP fb group. See if people would keep targeting if it was a nickname the child chose for himself.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

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    Oh and I can't do paragraphs with my laptop so responding with this thing is kind of annoying too. I got pulled over yesterday after picking up a bed for Sawyer that upon arriving home and setting up with dbf, realized it wasn't quite right. It was a former crib turned toddler bed but only had 2 sides! I felt really stupid for not realizing it needed a third side to be sturdy enough. It is a brand new children's consingnment in my town and when I mentioned that I'd never seen one without the 3rd rail for toddler conversion, they assured me this brand went down to 2. But sure enough, dbf was right, upon google we realized they were wrong. I didn't want to say they knew and didn't care, but when dbf brought it back, after I'd called, he said they mentioned they were annoyed because they help it for me (I'd called to see if they had a toddler bed, they said they did and they'd hold it for me) for 3 days. He said he was very nice about it but I'm not sure he was because he was highly annoyed but told them they could not sell it like this as it wouldn't be safe and they didn't respond, were just pissy. Probably won't go there again. Oh, but I got pulled over for going 41 in a 25!! I am not a speeder. I don't know what I was thinking! Not at all, apparently. But I was shocked he didn't ticket me, just told me to watch my speed. It was the best part of my day, him not giving me a ticket.

  26. #42146

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    Savana to this day says "fathering me" instead of "bothering me". Otherwise, she is ahead of the curve and always has been. Just that one word. Oh, and it's not a mispronunciation here but she also says, "depending to" instead of "compared to". With the fathering vs bothering one, Kai has started to give her a hard time and say, "Oh, I'm sorry I trying to be father to you." Lol

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    You were probably totally involved with your drama with the store and didn't even notice. How annoying about the bed.

    My mom was saying she got a speeding ticket for the first time in her life at age 73. She was going 65 in a 45 zone. My mother literally is the one going 30 in a 45 zone and everyone is honking at her frantically and she refuses to speed up. Apparently she was driving home from choir practice and singing a song they were working on with a very fast tempo. As she was leaving, her director told her to be careful not to get a speeding ticket, and she did!!! This is hilarious to me.
    Me (40) DH (47) & furbabies * m/c 7/08 4/12 11/12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwenn View Post
    I see what you are saying. Often people will pick up on kid's names as one of the first things to work on just to make life easier. I have known kids that couldn't say their names and yes, it's an appropriate thing to work on. But if he can say his name, but prefers the nickname, I would mention it to the speech therapist and ask her to pick another target because he is able to distinguish between the two and prefers his nickname. That's a choice he is allowed to make. If he was Billy she wouldn't force him to call himself William, right? I think I would have a polite chat (as opposed to a crazy-ass rant).

    I actually think I might pose this as a question in my SLP fb group. See if people would keep targeting if it was a nickname the child chose for himself.
    I think it's a little late for all that. It first came up in Oct. I just correct myself when I slip and call him Nonner and he calls me out on it. Eventually he'll get it and be ok with us calling him Nonner. I hope

    Quote Originally Posted by Bridget View Post
    Oh and I can't do paragraphs with my laptop so responding with this thing is kind of annoying too. I got pulled over yesterday after picking up a bed for Sawyer that upon arriving home and setting up with dbf, realized it wasn't quite right. It was a former crib turned toddler bed but only had 2 sides! I felt really stupid for not realizing it needed a third side to be sturdy enough. It is a brand new children's consingnment in my town and when I mentioned that I'd never seen one without the 3rd rail for toddler conversion, they assured me this brand went down to 2. But sure enough, dbf was right, upon google we realized they were wrong. I didn't want to say they knew and didn't care, but when dbf brought it back, after I'd called, he said they mentioned they were annoyed because they help it for me (I'd called to see if they had a toddler bed, they said they did and they'd hold it for me) for 3 days. He said he was very nice about it but I'm not sure he was because he was highly annoyed but told them they could not sell it like this as it wouldn't be safe and they didn't respond, were just pissy. Probably won't go there again. Oh, but I got pulled over for going 41 in a 25!! I am not a speeder. I don't know what I was thinking! Not at all, apparently. But I was shocked he didn't ticket me, just told me to watch my speed. It was the best part of my day, him not giving me a ticket.
    Awesome!!! I don't generally speed either, but I've found myself going well over the speed limit, in areas I'm familiar with, on occasion as well. It's easy enough to do when you get distracted.

    wtf about the consignment shop? Oiy, I wouldn't go there either.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bridget View Post
    Savana to this day says "fathering me" instead of "bothering me". Otherwise, she is ahead of the curve and always has been. Just that one word. Oh, and it's not a mispronunciation here but she also says, "depending to" instead of "compared to". With the fathering vs bothering one, Kai has started to give her a hard time and say, "Oh, I'm sorry I trying to be father to you." Lol
    Freudian slip, perhaps? lol

    Mama to Bobbie 20 ~ Jesi 18 ~ Syd 14 ~ Conner 6
    I'm gonna be a Gramama! Jesi is due 11/22/13


  29. #42149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwenn View Post
    You were probably totally involved with your drama with the store and didn't even notice. How annoying about the bed.

    My mom was saying she got a speeding ticket for the first time in her life at age 73. She was going 65 in a 45 zone. My mother literally is the one going 30 in a 45 zone and everyone is honking at her frantically and she refuses to speed up. Apparently she was driving home from choir practice and singing a song they were working on with a very fast tempo. As she was leaving, her director told her to be careful not to get a speeding ticket, and she did!!! This is hilarious to me.

    Mama to Bobbie 20 ~ Jesi 18 ~ Syd 14 ~ Conner 6
    I'm gonna be a Gramama! Jesi is due 11/22/13


  30. #42150

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    B, the thing with the bed sounds so annoying. I'm glad dbf helped you handle it. That store sounds shady for giving you a hard time on something they surely knew was a problem.
    Savana is so cute - "fathering me!" DD1 used to say F for her SP words when she was little -- one in particular she said a lot was "farkles" for sparkles. To this day, whenever we see something with glitter on it, we say "It's so farkly!"

    I'm glad you didn't get a ticket!
    I've only ever had one, and I got it when dd1 was a baby. I had just started back to work a few weeks before, leaving my little two-month-old baby with my mom, and one morning dd1 was crabby and I was a little late getting off to work. I had a meeting and I was stressed about getting there on time. I was going 57 in a 45 on a busy thoroughfare (and at same speed as the other traffic, btw), and got pulled over. I'd never even been pulled over before, and as he was going to his car to get his ticket book I started to cry. I had so much going on in my life at the time, I could barely afford my insurance as it was, and now I was going to be late to my meeting. When he came back to the car, I tried to hide it but he could tell. He said, with no emotion whatsoever, "I notice you're crying. I guess if it's so upsetting, you should drive the speed limit, shouldn't you?"
    That would have been a nice time for a cop to have given me a break. But my dad thought it was so hilarious that I'd gotten a ticket (with my perfect driving record!) that he framed it for me. I had it up in my living room for years.
    -- mom to DD1 1/98 and DD2 10/09


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